Drowning Prevention Auckland was formed in 1994 with a vision of an Auckland free from drowning achieved through the development of our water competence and changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours.

Our connection with wai (water) is because we have some of the most beautiful water environments in Tāmaki Makaurau. We have the Waitemāta, Manukau, and Kaipara harbours; 411 km of rivers; 128 km of lake edge; and 3700 km of coastlines.

Wai is the source of life, but it can also be the cause of death through drowning. We need to respect and understand wai. Drowning Prevention education, research, and advocacy is paramount for Tāmaki Makaurau’s wellbeing and safety in, on and around water environments.

Our approach is across three channels of engagement and delivery – where we live (community), where we work (workplace), and where we learn (education). Through a range of innovative, evaluated and enjoyable learning opportunities we help individuals, families, communities and workplaces to be safe from drowning.


MĀTĀPONO MĀORI WAI HAUMARU

(MĀORI WATER SAFETY GUIDING PRINCIPLES)

Latest News

Mid Winter Forum 2022

Mid Winter Forum 2022

WHEN Thursday 23 June, 2022 - 2pm to 4pm WHERE DPA Office, 85 Westhaven Drive, Auckland. RSVP To [email protected] by Thursday 16 JuneCome along to hear about:How research is informing the development of national PRE guidelines and how this can provide safer...

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SUP Safety

SUP Safety

Stand up paddle boarding is a popular activity for people of all ages and activity levels. This means that there is a wide range in the level of ability and confidence amongst paddle boarders. We want everyone to be able to safely enjoy this water sport which is great...

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Rip Current Safety

Rip Current Safety

Getting caught in a rip current is an all-too-common occurence at our surf beaches in Aotearoa, with tens of thousands of rescues taking place every year and many of the fatal drownings at beaches being directly related to rip currents. Over the last ten years, over...

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